Dispersion of Hydrogen Clouds

Dispersion of Hydrogen Clouds. Michael R. Swain. Eric S. Grilliot. Matthew N. Swain. University of Miami. The following is the presentation of a simplification of the Hydrogen Risk Assessment Method previously developed at the University of Miami.

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Dispersion of Hydrogen Clouds, Michael R. Swain, Eric S. Grilliot, Matthew N. Swain, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, Abstract, Simplification of the Hydrogen Risk Assessment Method, to reduce the need for CFD modeling. General findings were as follows:, 1 – Data from the 20 enclosures modeled to date. The ratio, between helium and hydrogen concentration values near the ceiling, are plotted. 2- CDF results for helium in chimney, 3 – CDF results for hydrogen in chimney, Explanation of Results, 4 – Surface of constant 6.5% hydrogen concentration after leakage at, 7200 l/hr for 25 minutes, 5 – Leakage in garage. Single vent garage door. Plywood in center of floor. Leakage rate:, 7200 l/h, 6 – Surface of constant 1.7% hydrogen concentration after leakage at, 7200 l/hr for 10 minutes, 7 – Leakage in garage. Double vent garage door. Home refueling unit opposite garage, door. Leakage rate: 7200 l/hr, 8 – Leakage in garage. Double vent garage door. Home, refueling unit opposite garage door. Leakage rate: 14,400 l/hr, 9 – Leakage in garage. Double vent garage door. Home, refueling unit opposite garage door. Leakage rate: 21,600 l/hr, 10 – Leakage in garage. Double vent garage door. Home refueling unit opposite garage door. Leakage rate:, 11 – Surface of constant 7.5% hydrogen concentration, after leakage at 6796 l/hr for 20 minutes, 12 – Leakage in garage. Single vent garage door. Home refueling unit opposite garage, door. Leakage rate: 6796 l/hr, 13 – Leakage in garage. Single vent high in garage door. Home refueling unit opposite, garage door. Leakage rate: 6796 l/hr, 14 – Leakage in garage. Single vent low in garage door. Home refueling unit opposite, garage door. Leakage rate: 6796 l/h, 15 – Surface of constant 34% hydrogen concentration after, leakage at 43,200 l/hr for 20 minutes, 16 – Leakage in garage. Single vent low in garage door. Home refueling unit opposite, garage door. Leakage rate: 43,200 l/hr, 17 – Surface of constant 6.5% hydrogen concentration after, leakage at 6796 l/hr for 20 minutes, 18 – Leakage in garage. Single vent garage door. Van in standard position. Leakage rate:, 6796 l/h, 19 – Leakage in garage. Single vent garage door. Van near garage door. Leakage rate:, 6796 l/h, 20 – Leakage in garage. Single vent high in garage door. Van in standard position. Leakage, rate: 6796 l/h, 21 – Surface of constant 3.0% hydrogen concentration after, leakage at 27,184 l/hr for 1 minute, 22 – Leakage at end of hallway. Double vent opposite leak. Leakage rate: 27,184 l/hr, 23 – Surface of constant 4.0% hydrogen concentration after, leakage at 27,184 l/hr for 20 minutes, 24 – Leakage at end of hallway. Double vent opposite leak. Chimney on roof vent. Leakage, rate: 27,184 l/hr, 25 – Surface of constant 4.8% hydrogen concentration after leakage at, 27,184 l/hr for 20 minutes, 26 – Leakage in middle of hallway. Double vent at end of hallway. Leakage, rate: 27,184 l/hr, 27 – Surface of constant 4.1% hydrogen concentration after, leakage at 27,184 l/hr for 20 minutes, 28 – Leakage in middle of hallway. Double vent at end of hallway. Leakage, rate: 27,184 l/hr, 29 – Surface of constant 36% hydrogen concentration after, leakage at 27,184 l/hr for 20 minutes, 30 – Leakage at end of hallway. Single vent high at opposite end of hallway. Leakage rate: 27,184 l/hr

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